Gilbert Carrara speaks at a conference on Globalization at UN Headquarters in New York City

 

New York City, New York – September 9, 2017 – Battalia Winston today announced that the leader of their Life Science and Healthcare team, Gilbert Carrara, Jr., MD spoke at the Martin Tuchman School of Management Fall program on Globalization 2020 at UN Headquarters in NYC on September 8th .

From Davos to Wall Street, concern over job losses, trade imbalances, falling wages and environmental impacts has shifted the pro-globalization consensus, with various camps reflecting diverse perspectives as to the real impacts. Are we witnessing a clearer view of the pros and cons of free trade and nebulous borders or is there a fundamental shift in the view of globalization’s effects and benefits, from those industry leaders, financial elites, and economists, who were once its most ardent proponents?

Also present at the conference were the Dean and professors from the Tuchman School of Management, executives from the UN Headquarters, Verizon, Toys”R”Us, Prudential and IRI Worldwide.

Dr. Carrara spoke directly to the current state of the global job market and the direction it is most likely going to take in the future with the rapid expansion and globalization of businesses. He gave real life examples of how company executives are selecting executives and organizing their teams using people analytics and provided job market perspective on what executive candidates will need to think about when applying for roles in the future. He also discussed the impact that artificial intelligence and machine language will have on the job market in the near future. Gil works with large and small life science and healthcare companies around the globe and has seen the impact that globalization has made on the careers of current senior executives and will most likely make on our future executives’ careers. He concluded by discussing where he felt shortages of talent and global competition will most likely be seen in the future and explained how corporations will need to manage their executives more effectively than in the past in order to retain them.


Retail Succession Planning: Now and Then

Succession planning has always been an important discussion topic for every thoughtful or “planful” retail company. However, with the paradigm shift taking place in the industry, the importance of the process and of making it more than talk has become critical for several reasons. Not only is the current generation of retail leadership retiring in large numbers, the likelihood is that this attrition will continue well into the next two decades. Tie this basic reality to a noticeable lack of prepared talent to fill these critical vacancies, and the current retail business readjustment will continue on its own path with few to influence where that path leads. With the decline in executive training and professional development programs, as well as the changes in leadership profiles (from merchandising to marketing, from marketing to digital), the industry is sure to face continued drift and dislocation.

Once executive leadership in a company understands that a deliberate succession plan is a necessary part of the total strategic planning process, they will next face a process that’s much different from the succession planning processes to date. So what’s so different now?

Read the full article


Bruce Walton Featured Twice in Family Firm Institute (FFI) Practitioner

Bruce Walton, Boston Partner and Co-Head of the Family Business Practice, has contributed two short articles to the FFI Practitioner.

The first article, published 4/19, deals with the issue of “Fit, ” addressing the concepts of core family values, alignment and stewardship as well as clarifying issues of whether or not a candidate actually has demonstrated the key competencies necessary to do the job successfully.  Read the full article

The second article, published 6/7, deals with Long Term Incentive Programs (LTIPs), addressing issues of best practices for structuring LTIPs, the value of working with compensation consultants and ensuring that payouts are made only when new enterprise value is created. Read the full article


The Diversity Gap in the Nonprofit Sector

The lack of diversity at the highest levels of the country’s corporations has become a popular topic of debate, thanks in part to a number of high-profile stories focused on the technology industry.

If there has been less criticism of the nonprofit and foundation sectors, neither is exempt from the problem. Earlier this year, Battalia Winston analyzed the leadership teams of the largest foundations and nonprofits in the United States and found that they, too, suffer from homogeneity. We found, for instance, that while 42 percent of the organizations we surveyed are led by female executive directors, 87 percent of all executive directors or presidents were white, and that there was only minimal representation of African Americans (6 percent), Asian Americans (3 percent), and Hispanics (4 percent) in those positions.

Our findings, which we’ve published in a white paper, The State of Diversity in Nonprofit and Foundation Leadership, are similar to those presented in a number of recent studies. A 2015 study by Community Wealth Partners, for example, found that only 8 percent of nonprofit executive directors were people of color, while a 2013 study conducted by D5 found that 92 percent of foundation executive directors were white.

While one would think that nonprofits and foundations — particularly those that support underserved communities and minorities — would prioritize diversity within their leadership ranks, attracting and recruiting diverse talent is easier said than done, especially at the leadership level. If organizations want to create sustained diversity at the top, they need to continuously cultivate a talent pipeline of diverse high-potential candidates, both internally and externally.

For any number of reasons, building a pipeline of diverse talent can be particularly challenging for nonprofits and foundations. First, the talent pool of diverse candidates is still significantly smaller than the pool of white candidates. According to a 2016 study by Young Invincibles, racial disparities in rates of higher education attainment continue to widen: between 2007 and 2015, the gap between the share of white adults with postsecondary degrees and Latinos and African Americans with postsecondary degrees increased by 2.2 and 0.4 percentage points, respectively.

Second, while for-profit enterprises, especially those in the tech sector, are able to make large investments in diversity and inclusion initiatives and, of course, offer attractive salaries, nonprofits and foundations often lack the financial resources to do so. Without a concerted diversity and inclusion effort backed by a well-developed employer branding strategy, these organizations often struggle to attract and retain the diverse talent they need.

Fortunately, there are a number of best practices that nonprofits and foundations can implement that don’t require major financial investment and can help make them more attractive to diverse talent:

Prioritize diversity organization-wide. Nonprofits and foundations should aim to foster diversity across — and beyond — the organization, from staff, to vendors and suppliers, to the community organizations they partner with and support.

Create clear career paths. If an employee cannot see a clear career path within an organization or easily identify opportunities to advance, he or she is less likely to hang in for the long haul. Establishing professional development and inclusive leadership training programs can help diverse employees see an organization as a place to grow, not as a stepping-stone to something bigger and better.

It’s also important for organizations to create mentorship programs that proactively include diverse employees, who — especially in mostly white environments — are less likely to receive organic mentorship and networking opportunities than their white counterparts.

Proactively identify high-potential talent. Nonprofits should also be aware that as boomers retire in ever-larger numbers, they have the opportunity to add diversity onto the tail end of the employee lifecycle. Leadership can use those transitions to engage in a succession-management process, asking soon-to-depart employees to sponsor and mentor potential leaders inside the organization, prepare them for promotion, and encourage diverse candidates to express their interest in moving up.

Foster a culture of inclusion. Organizations looking to attract and retain diverse talent need to create a culture that truly embraces diverse opinions, perspectives, and lifestyles. Fortunately, there are many ways to achieve that: creating diversity committees with representatives from all levels of the organization and making diversity goals a transparent part of an organization’s overall strategic plan are just two of them. Organizations can also offer flexible working schedules, make accommodations for religious holidays in different faith traditions, and adopt diversity-friendly dress codes.

Most for-profit companies have put out some type of diversity statement and have strategies in place to meet their goals. It’s time for nonprofits and foundations sectors to do the same and incorporate diversity into every aspect of their hiring practices, as opposed to just “talking” about it. Tiptoeing around the diversity conversation will never help your organization achieve its goals or keep it competitive in the twenty-first century economy.

Want to learn more? Download a copy of our white paper, The State of Diversity in Nonprofit and Foundation Leadership. And feel free to share your own tips and best practices in the comments section below.


Fit and Family-Owned Business

Bruce Walton, Partner in Battalia Winston’s Family-Owned Business Practice, contributed the following piece to The Practitioner, a publication from the Family Firm Institute. 

When I’m helping family-owned businesses find new executive leadership, I often hear the following: “We want to find someone who is the right fit.” This word—fit—is difficult to define, yet is always key to a successful hire. When assessing candidates for fit, it’s helpful to use the following questions as guiding principles:

1. Does the candidate’s leadership style align with company’s value systems?

Fit really means linking the value systems and leadership style of the executive candidate with those of the hiring company. In fact, “value systems linkage” is the best predictor of happiness, in all its dimensions, for any hire. Therefore, for a family-owned business, where hiring a non-family CEO can often feel like arranging a marriage, fit is particularly important.

Naturally, the starting point for the hiring process is understanding the Core Family Values that drive the business. Businesses that have survived across multiple generations have invested much thought in the development of family values. They are typically recorded somewhere, either in a corporate handbook, website, or other core material. If this is not the case, formalizing and recording corporate values is an important exercise to complete before starting a CEO or COO search. Since the family can never be separated from the business, these core values will drive decisions that otherwise would be hard for an outsider to understand.

2. Does the candidate possess the most important competencies for the position?

When a candidate clearly aligns with the family’s value system, it can be tempting to conclude that the candidate is automatically a great fit. However, it’s important to move the decision beyond “I like them.” This is why a position competency model, designed to measure the candidate’s specific skill set against the company’s business goals, is critical. The key is to build a competency model that helps separate and prioritize the must-haves from the nice-to-haves. Nobody will be a perfect match on every competency, but the best candidate will have successfully demonstrated the top three to five competencies in the recent past.

3. Will the candidate be a steward of the family’s success?

When I try to consolidate all of the aspects of fit for family businesses, the single word that comes to mind is “stewardship.” Good candidates understand and appreciate what the family has already built. The new CEO becomes a steward of that success, even when the mandate is to transform the company. Family members in the business, ownership or governance have their own self-images (both within the family and in the community or industry) so tightly connected to the business that outside leadership needs to account for it and factor it into the leadership process.

To be a successful steward for the company, the candidate must be a confident adult who is prepared to handle sensitive situations that will arise within family businesses. For example, a mature non-family CEO will be able to react appropriately when ownership wants to drill down into the details of the business, as they always do at some point. The mature steward will not be threatened by this, while an insecure autocrat will not react well.

Investor Relations (IR) also deserves some thought. Every CEO spends a significant amount of time caring for the company’s owners. In public or private equity owned companies, this is pretty clear. In a family-owned business IR involves multi-generational dynamics and strong emotions. It may involve dealing with a Family Council or helping educate a new generation to be successful future owners. So IR does not go away; it is just very different.

In summary, the “best fit” candidates will embrace the core family values and have the capacity and patience to deal with family dynamics without becoming embroiled in them. At the same time the non-family leader will have the right core competencies to lead the business to success, however it may be defined.