Susan Medina Places Gloria Lara as CEO of the Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Battalia Winston is pleased to announce the placement of Gloria Lara as Chief Executive Officer of the Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (MHCC). Susan Medina, Partner in Battalia Winston’s Diversity and Inclusion Practice, completed the search.

Gloria Lara is the former CEO of the Girl Scout Council, where she served as the chief spokesperson for the organization and drove funding development efforts. Lara has extensive experience in finance, marketing, sales and project management and has held executive positions at IBM, Chrysler Corporation, and Jervis B. Webb Company, among others.

The Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is the largest and best recognized organization in Michigan that promotes the development, growth and visibility of Hispanic-owned businesses. MHCC members have a collective gross revenue of more than $3 billion, and the organization was recently named Chamber of the Year by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.


As Companies Crack the Diversity Code, Leadership Teams Still Lag

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez recently contributed the following article to Workforce Magazine. 

Like several Silicon Valley counterparts, tech giant Intel last year went public with its lack of employee diversity. The company is openly sharing its efforts to correct the problem. In an interview with NPR, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich discussed his company’s diversity initiatives and concluded that the “pipeline problem,” or the idea that there aren’t enough qualified diverse candidates, is overhyped, saying, “If the pipeline was such a big problem, I would have come back as a failure.”

It’s true the pipeline problem is somewhat improving — at least at the entry level — for companies like Intel that have the budget to invest in targeted recruitment programs. As more companies formalize diversity initiatives, partner with educational institutions and community organizations, and train their hiring managers on the effects of unconscious bias, they will be able to bring in more diverse talent in their junior and mid-level ranks. For example, Apple reported a 50 percent increase in the number of African-Americans hired in 2015 compared to 2014, and a 66 percent increase in Hispanics.

But this improvement is not producing greater diversity representation in the C-suite. In 2014, only 4 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs were minorities, and only 5 percent were women. Move down the corporate ladder into the executive ranks and the percentages do not improve. According to DiversityInc, Hispanics make up less than 4 percent of senior management in U.S. companies. African-Americans make up less than 3 percent, and Catalyst reports that women of color are virtually absent at the senior-level and above in S&P 500 companies.
Continue reading on Workforce. 


Reducing Staff Turnover for Nonprofits and Associations

Dale Winston recently contributed the following article to Associations Now.

With smaller, less hierarchical organizational charts, associations often struggle with attrition, losing aspiring leaders to other organizations. However, with a focus on better succession planning, leadership assessment, and onboarding, an association can slow the outflow of top talent.

Late last year, one of the largest health research foundations in the world approached our firm with an urgent request: It needed to find a transformational head of human resources to help the organization address an alarmingly high rate of employee turnover. The foundation was struggling to retain top performers within its junior- and mid-level ranks. The losses were creating disruption throughout the organization, particularly at the leadership level. Without a sufficient pool of “high-potentials” capable of moving up through the organization, the existing management team was unable to develop and nurture a pipeline of potential successors.

Continue reading on Associations Now. 


Susan Medina and Peter Gomez Discuss Diversity and Inclusion with Chicago Tribune

Battalia Winston Partners Susan Medina and Peter Gomez recently contributed to an article in the Chicago Tribune entitled “Some financial firms tackle diversity gap head-on, say they can’t afford not to.”

The article explores how the financial services companies in Chicago are working to attract and retain more diverse talent:

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez, Chicago headhunters who specialize in recruiting minority candidates for executive roles, said attention to diversity transparency in Silicon Valley and other industries has helped move the conversation in the right direction. But many efforts continue to be just lip service.

And there are more insidious challenges.

“When people think diversity, they think minority, and when they think minority, they think lowering the bar, and that’s a mindset that has to change,” Medina said.

Read the full article here. 

 


How Will Brexit Affect the Hiring Decisions of International Companies?

Terry Gallagher has shared his insights on the hiring implications of Brexit with CEO World. In this article, Terry identifies 5 immediate realities international companies must be prepared for:

  1. Companies will be in fierce competition for talent in European countries.
  2. Businesses that “wait and see” will fall behind.
  3. Leaders that are nimble, flexible and comfortable with change will succeed.
  4. Companies that lack change management expertise in the c-suite will need to bring someone on board – quickly.
  5. Temporary hires will be tempting, but ultimately won’t be a good solution.

Read the entire article on CEO World. 


Rahquel Purcell joins L’Oreal as Vice President Supply Chain, Americas

Rahquel Purcell has joined L’Oreal as Vice President Supply Chain, Americas. Terry Gallagher completed the search.

L’Oreal, the world’s largest beauty products company with revenue in the Americas of $16 Billion, creates cosmetics, perfume, and hair and skin care items. L’Oréal USA boasts a host of consumer and luxury brands, including Garnier, Maybelline, Lancôme, and Kiehl’s. It also owns salon professional product makers Matrix and Kérastase, as well as mass market label SoftSheen/Carson and perfume brands Ralph Lauren and Giorgio Armani. L’Oréal sells its products across 130 countries. Worldwide, the beauty company boasts two dozen research centers and about 15 evaluation centers, 45 factories and some 70 distribution centers, and a handful of development and learning centers with global revenues of $32 Billion.

Ms. Purcell has a 24 year career history working for Proctor & Gamble. She is a supply chain executive with a proven track record of transforming organizations, developing opportunities and delivering game-changing results. She is a strategic thought leader with international business management experience and supply chain breadth spanning global Procurement, Supply Planning, Distribution Management and Customer Service Operations. Most recently, Ms. Purcell was Director of Global Packaging & Design Purchases and led a global team to procure $5.5 billion in packaging materials and design services. She also served as Senior Purchases Leader for the Beauty Sector, supporting $6.8 billion in raw and pack material procurement for Hair, Skin, Prestige and Cosmetics.

Prior to that Ms. Purcell was Director, Global Product Supply Leader for New Business Creation and was on the Special Task Force to deliver $5 billion in incremental revenue in 3 years. As Director of North America Product Supply Operations, she was responsible for $30 billion in finished products and led 1,200 people managing 22 distribution centers supporting 18 consumer goods categories and 2,000 daily shipments.

Ms. Purcell earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from the University of Michigan on a full academic scholarship. Ms. Purcell also serves on the Board of Directors for the National Urban League’s Cincinnati Chapter.


Terry Gallagher Shares His Perspective on the Hiring Implications of Brexit

Terry Gallagher, President of Battalia Winston, recently shared his perspective on the hiring implications of Brexit with HRE Daily. Through his work with a number of international companies, Terry is already seeing how the Brexit fallout is shaping the hiring decisions and retention strategies of his clients. Companies that retain their top performers and develop strategic talent acquisition plans will fare better than those who halt staffing investments, he says.

“The biggest challenge will be to engage and retain talent in this environment of more global uncertainty and more possible exits from the E.U.” he says. “Those companies that are nimble and proactive will do better than those waiting to see the impact and putting everything on hold.”

Read the complete article here. 


Letha A. Steffey Joins Protection 1 as VP, Integrated Marketing and Planning

Protection 1 is a $650+ million premier full service security provider backed by Apollo Private Equity that protects residential, business, national account and integrated system customers at millions of locations. They are a vibrant, growing company and serve over 2.5 million customers with 4,200 employees at more than 80 full-service branch locations across the country.

Terry Gallagher completed the search. The successful candidate was identified in 9 days and the search was completed in 147 days.

Ms. Steffey has 25 years of marketing experience working in VP roles companies like Hallmark Cards, Zillner Marketing, Enhance Publications and most recently AMC Entertainment, Inc.

At AMC Theaters, a $2.2 billion company which serves 200 million customers annually through more than 350 theatres nationwide, Ms. Steffey was Vice President, Studio Partnerships and was responsible for revenue generation and film terms negotiation with movie distribution partners Disney, Warner Bros, Lionsgate Films and several other major studios. Ms. Steffey negotiated key short and long term deals and developed innovative marketing initiatives that led to strong AMC market share and incremental revenue gains.

Previously Ms. Steffey served as Marketing Executive and Chief of Staff, Marketing reporting to Hallmark Chief Operating Officer where she led a team of 80 that was accountable for marketing strategy, communications, multi-million dollar budget and flawless retail execution of marketing media and merchandising campaign programs for corporate owned and franchise stores; promotions, trade shows, and retail tests; partner with ad agencies to deliver sustainable CRM.

She earned a MBA in Finance from Webster University and an undergraduate degree from Jewell College.

 


How to Vet Leaders for Crisis and Change Management Skills

Terry Gallagher contributed the following article to Manufacturing Business Technology.

To stay competitive in today’s market, industrial and manufacturing companies must constantly respond to rapid change. Change comes in many forms — the positive changes associated with emerging technology, new product developments and company growth — and the more disruptive changes resulting from recalls, accidents or failed product roll-outs. Regardless of the nature of the change at hand, when an organization is looking for a new leader, he or she should be carefully vetted for crisis and change management skills.

I help companies in the industrial and manufacturing industry recruit leaders, and in nearly 90 percent of the searches I conduct the client specifically asks for change management skills. A number of market conditions have combined to make change management and crisis management even more critical than they were a few years ago. As our economy becomes more global, industrial and manufacturing companies aren’t just up against regional or national competitors — they’re competing with companies worldwide. The increasingly competitive market means that companies must relentlessly pursue methods for producing superior products at a better cost. Companies are continuously searching for ways to automate, streamline, innovate and attract customers who are savvier and more educated about their choices than ever before.

Internally, companies are dealing with the impending retirement of baby boomers and a widening manufacturing skills gap, which, according to a 2015 study by Deloitte, could result in 2 million unfilled jobs over the next several decades.

Needless to say, companies need strong leaders with a proven track record of change management in order to propel business growth and retain and recruit top talent. To ensure that prospective executives have the required skills, companies should consider applying the following best practices:

Ask the Right Questions During the Interview.
An open-ended question, like “Can you tell me about your change management skills?” will not provide the insight decision makers need to properly evaluate the candidate. Instead, ask a more pointed, metric-based question. For example: “What is the most significant change management situation that you have led, why was it important to the organization and what were the results in terms of revenue cost saves and enhanced customer service?” These questions leave no space for vague answers of ambiguity. If the candidate can’t fully provide a response, he or she likely does not have the necessary change management skills.

Confirm That the Candidate’s Broader Skill Set Aligns With an Ability to Manage Change.
Managing change or navigating a company through a crisis involves a suite of skills that will come into play long after the initial communication of the situation. The ideal candidate should have experience in new product development, changing product mix, and overall project management skills. The candidate should also be able to effectively hire and retain new talent. For example, if a company is entering a new market or introducing a new product, the new leader will naturally need to hire new talent for the R&D and sales team.

Consider Looking Outside of Your Specific Sector.
When a company is in a transition period, considering a candidate from another sector can seem risky. Bringing in an “outsider” can fuel uncertainty among employees, board members, and shareholders. However, a leader with a different perspective and experience in another industry may be exactly what is required. I recently worked with a company (a major producer of consumer goods in the Northeast) that had a product suite consisting of both low-tech and high-tech products and processes. The company wanted to move away from the low-tech (and low-profit, low-margin) work and focus on their high-tech products. In order to do so, they needed a new leader — one with creativity and experience working with a highly engineered products R&D Department. This type of candidate simply could not be found in their sector. Instead, we brought in a new executive from s a highly engineered custom product manufacturer in the high technology industry, with the right experience and change management skills, and the company is now in the process of changing their product mix.


Susan Medina and Peter Gomez Contribute to Crain’s Chicago Business

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez of Battalia Winston’s Diversity and Inclusion Practice recently contributed an article to Crain’s Chicago Business.

When Ursula Burns steps down from Xerox later this year, the number of black female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies will shrink to zero. Burns will exit a very homogeneous group of leaders—one that currently has only four black male and nine Hispanic CEOs.

While diversity of the population as a whole is increasing across the country, the representation of people of color in C-suites is decreasing. This is particularly true here in Chicago. According to Chicago United’s Corporate Diversity Profile, minority groups make up only 8 percent of C-level executive positions in the top 50 public Chicago companies; 17 of those companies, or 34 percent, have no ethnic diversity within their executive ranks at all.

Read the full article on Crain’s.