Susan Medina Places Gloria Lara as CEO of the Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Battalia Winston is pleased to announce the placement of Gloria Lara as Chief Executive Officer of the Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (MHCC). Susan Medina, Partner in Battalia Winston’s Diversity and Inclusion Practice, completed the search.

Gloria Lara is the former CEO of the Girl Scout Council, where she served as the chief spokesperson for the organization and drove funding development efforts. Lara has extensive experience in finance, marketing, sales and project management and has held executive positions at IBM, Chrysler Corporation, and Jervis B. Webb Company, among others.

The Michigan Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is the largest and best recognized organization in Michigan that promotes the development, growth and visibility of Hispanic-owned businesses. MHCC members have a collective gross revenue of more than $3 billion, and the organization was recently named Chamber of the Year by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

As Companies Crack the Diversity Code,
Leadership Teams Still Lag

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez recently contributed the following article to Workforce Magazine. 

Like several Silicon Valley counterparts, tech giant Intel last year went public with its lack of employee diversity. The company is openly sharing its efforts to correct the problem. In an interview with NPR, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich discussed his company’s diversity initiatives and concluded that the “pipeline problem,” or the idea that there aren’t enough qualified diverse candidates, is overhyped, saying, “If the pipeline was such a big problem, I would have come back as a failure.”

It’s true the pipeline problem is somewhat improving — at least at the entry level — for companies like Intel that have the budget to invest in targeted recruitment programs. As more companies formalize diversity initiatives, partner with educational institutions and community organizations, and train their hiring managers on the effects of unconscious bias, they will be able to bring in more diverse talent in their junior and mid-level ranks. For example, Apple reported a 50 percent increase in the number of African-Americans hired in 2015 compared to 2014, and a 66 percent increase in Hispanics.

But this improvement is not producing greater diversity representation in the C-suite. In 2014, only 4 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs were minorities, and only 5 percent were women. Move down the corporate ladder into the executive ranks and the percentages do not improve. According to DiversityInc, Hispanics make up less than 4 percent of senior management in U.S. companies. African-Americans make up less than 3 percent, and Catalyst reports that women of color are virtually absent at the senior-level and above in S&P 500 companies.
Continue reading on Workforce. 

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez Discuss Diversity and Inclusion with Chicago Tribune

Battalia Winston Partners Susan Medina and Peter Gomez recently contributed to an article in the Chicago Tribune entitled “Some financial firms tackle diversity gap head-on, say they can’t afford not to.”

The article explores how the financial services companies in Chicago are working to attract and retain more diverse talent:

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez, Chicago headhunters who specialize in recruiting minority candidates for executive roles, said attention to diversity transparency in Silicon Valley and other industries has helped move the conversation in the right direction. But many efforts continue to be just lip service.

And there are more insidious challenges.

“When people think diversity, they think minority, and when they think minority, they think lowering the bar, and that’s a mindset that has to change,” Medina said.

Read the full article here. 

 

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez Contribute to Crain’s Chicago Business

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez of Battalia Winston’s Diversity and Inclusion Practice recently contributed an article to Crain’s Chicago Business.

When Ursula Burns steps down from Xerox later this year, the number of black female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies will shrink to zero. Burns will exit a very homogeneous group of leaders—one that currently has only four black male and nine Hispanic CEOs.

While diversity of the population as a whole is increasing across the country, the representation of people of color in C-suites is decreasing. This is particularly true here in Chicago. According to Chicago United’s Corporate Diversity Profile, minority groups make up only 8 percent of C-level executive positions in the top 50 public Chicago companies; 17 of those companies, or 34 percent, have no ethnic diversity within their executive ranks at all.

Read the full article on Crain’s. 

New White Paper – Closing the Gender Gap: How Companies Can Retain Women Engineers

women_in_engineering_white_paper_coverThere’s been a surge in recent press about the lack of women in Engineering/Technology. While many media outlets are exploring this problem, few seem to be going to the source—women in engineering and technology—and asking them for their insight. Understanding this issue at the ground level is the key to improving the representation of women in engineering overall.

We went out into the marketplace and did just that: surveyed women to better understand why women engineers stay with (or leave) their employers. We developed the results of this anonymous survey  into a white paper to help Fortune 1000 companies understand the needs and drivers of women engineers to better attract and retain them.

To read and download the white paper, fill out the form below.

Closing the Gender Gap: How Companies Can Retain Women Engineers

Please provide the following information for instant access to the white paper.

Peter Gomez and Susan Medina Deliver Keynote Address at Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce’s Diversity and Inclusion Forum

Today Battalia Winston Partners Susan Medina and Peter Gomez delivered the keynote speech at The Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce’s Diversity and Inclusion Forum.

The forum was designed to help Michigan businesses and non-profits learn key strategies for diversifying their talent pipeline and growing their consumer base by engaging diverse talent.

Drawing from their experience helping hundreds of companies across the country recruit diverse executives and senior leadership, Susan and Peter discussed best practices for attracting and retaining diverse talent, trends in diversity and inclusion, and shared how many forward-thinking organizations are driving company performance through diversity-building initiatives.

Make Your Company a Magnet for Diversity

While companies like Facebook and Google have committed to improving minority representation, the pool for qualified diverse candidates is still quite small. Companies need to focus on both attracting diverse talent and on retaining current employees, who, as demand for diversity increases, are at risk for being poached by competitors.

In their recent article for Forefront Magazine, Susan Medina and Peter Gomez, Battalia Winston’s Diversity and Inclusion experts, share their recommendations for retaining talent and building sustained diversity.

Read their article on Forefront Magazine’s Blog.

Why You Should Do More Than Just Talk About Workplace Diversity

Susan Medina and Peter Gomez, Battalia Winston’s experts in Diversity and Inclusion, are featured in Fast Company with their article, “Why You Should Do More Than Just Talk About Workplace Diversity.”

Responding to Google’s recent disclosures about their homogenous workforce and renewed diversity and inclusion efforts, Medina and Gomez warn companies of common diversity-recruiting pitfalls and urge corporate leaders who are dedicated to sustained diversity to think strategically about talent development, retention, mentorship, and succession planning.

Read the article on Fast Company.